Gary Rivlin

Gary Rivlin

Long-time journalist Gary Rivlin is a reporting fellow with The Investigative Fund at The Nation Institute. A former New York Times reporter, he is the author of six books, including, most recently, Katrina: After the Flood, which the New York Times, NPR, and USA Today, among others, selected as a best book of the year in 2015. The book follows the city of New Orleans's efforts to rebuild itself after the storm’s immediate damage, but also the storm’s lasting effects not just on the city’s geography and infrastructure­ but also on its psychic, racial, and social fabric. His first book, Fire on the Prairie: Chicago's Harold Washington and the Politics of Race, prompted the late Studs Terkel to compare him to I.F. Stone and write, "Rivlin saw clearly what other journalists were blind to, and reported what they had non-reported." Rivlin is also the author of Broke, USA: From Pawnshops to Poverty, Inc. — How the Working Poor Became Big Business, which the New Yorker's James Surowiecki described as a "blistering new investigation of the subprime economy." Over the years, Rivlin had worked as a staff writer at the Chicago Reader, the East Bay Express, and the Industry Standard. Fire On the Prairie won the Carl Sandburg Award for best non-fiction book of the year. His second book, Drive-By, was a New York Times notable book of the year and finalist for PEN's "Best of the West" competition. Wrote Boyd Tonkin in the New Statesman of Drive-By, "Like Truman Capote (In Cold Blood) or Norman Mailer (The Executioner's Song), Rivlin takes a crime and makes it a mirror for its time and place…a gifted California reporter…[with] a sharp eye and a clear voice." Rivlin has also written a pair of books about technology, The Plot to Get Bill Gates and The Godfather of Silicon Valley, and won two Gerald Loeb Awards for excellence in business journalism, one in the magazine category and another for breaking news. He is a frequent public speaker and has appeared on Fresh Air, PBS's NewsHour, and This American Life, among other broadcast appearances. His work has appeared in the New York Times Magazine,WiredBusiness Week, and the Daily Beast, among other publications. As an Investigative Fund fellow, Rivlin has produced several recent investigations, including "Money for Nothing" for the Intercept, "Google's Payday Loan Gamble," for the New Yorker, and "Car Trouble" for Mother Jones. Last updated July 2017  

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